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OWNER BIOGRAPHIES

About Siena Restaurants

Brothers Anthony and Chris Tarro own all three restaurants in the Siena Restaurant Group.

 

Located in the heart of Providence’s Federal Hill, Siena Restaurant was opened in 2005 and features authentic Tuscan cuisine in a warm and lively atmosphere. While the brothers were raised in Warwick, R.I., their family has deep roots in the Italian-American community on Federal Hill making it the perfect location for their first restaurant.

Siena Cucina • Enoteca opened in 2007 just a few miles from where they grew up in East Greenwich. Siena Cucina • Enoteca compliments the trusted menu from the original Siena Restaurant, with many of the warm touches and great food found in kitchens and wine bars all over Italy.

The third Siena restaurant, Tavola da Siena located in Smithfield, opened in 2013. Stepping into Tavola da Siena feels like being transported to an upscale Tuscan farmhouse with the same great menu and warmth of service.

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Siena, Italy

Siena – the name alone evokes an image of Italy colored in terra cotta reds, earthy yellows, muted oranges, deep browns and rich greens accented with gold leaf. Siena was founded by the ancient Etruscans on three hills, overlooking the Tuscan countryside. During the Middle Ages, the city rose to political prominence along side Florence and Pisa. The Sienese artists rivaled the Florentines in directing the art of the early Italian Renaissance. Years of history meld together to form a distinctly unique Italian city.

The heart of the city is undoubtedly the Piazza del Campo. It is here, in this shell-shaped plaza, that the festival, which has become synonymous with the city, takes place. The Palio is at once a horse race and a fete of civic pride. Held twice a year, each Sienese contrada (local district) competes to win the Palio (the prize banner). The Palio is the most authentic of the Italian folk events, from the ritual blessing of the horses to the hours of pageantry, which precede the actual, rather brief, race.

For us, the most meaningful part of the Palio occurs on the eve of the race. The city is awash in the glow of hundreds of lanterns lining the streets, as each contrada hosts a dinner for its residents. Generations of family and friends come together — laughing, drinking, eating, and sharing — celebrating the best that life has to offer. It is this spirit of Siena we hope to share with you.